The Catholic University of America

Studio Art courses are subject to an additional course fee of $30 at the time of registration.

Course Descriptions

Art (ART)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

ART 101: Fundamentals of Design I

3.00 Credits

Introductory studio art course; primary goal is the development of an awareness and appreciation of the visual experience and of the limitless possibilities for making things of beauty and delight. Learning based largely on a conscious amassing of visual experiences and the development of seeing, upon which, eventually, to realize one's own visual language and visual value judgments. Studio exercises and lectures consider two-dimensional work and color. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 102: Fundamentals of Design II

3.00 Credits

Introductory studio art course. Studio projects and lectures include work in two and three dimensions plus problems in color. 101 not prerequisite to 102. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 112: Foundations of Art

3.00 Credits

Introduces students to the materials, techniques, concepts, and processes essential to understanding the visual arts and the role of the artist, through a series of projects, readings, class critiques, videos, slide presentations, and various kinds of field trips. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 201: Drawing and Composition I

3.00 Credits

Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 202: Drawing and Composition II

3.00 Credits

Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. 201 is not prerequisite to 202. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 203: Drawing Techniques of the Masters

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 204: Drawing for Beginners: Learning to See

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 205: Watercolor Painting

3.00 Credits

Introductory and intermediate problems in painting with transparent watercolor and gouache from still life, landscape, and figurative subjects. Surveys the history of the medium as well as contemporary approaches. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 207: Drawing and Composition for Artists I

3.00 Credits

Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Course reserved for Art majors. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 208: Drawing and Composition for Artists II

3.00 Credits

Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Course reserved for art majors. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 211: History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

3.00 Credits

A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture. Formerly 301.

ART 212: History of Art: From the Renaissance to the Modern Age

3.00 Credits

A survey of Western art from the fifteenth century to the present. Investigates Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, and Modern masterworks in terms of their formal development and cultural context through readings, lectures, class discussions, and field trips. Special emphasis on developing skills of visual literacy and critical thinking. Formerly 302.

ART 214: Architecture of Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

A survey of Roman architecture from its origins in Greek and Etruscans design through the Republican and Imperial Periods culminating in the early Christian age. This course will introduce the great buildings, engineering innovations, and remarkable urban development of Rome and its empire. It will include a focused study of individual monuments and great cities. Students will virtually tour some of Rome's most famous icons, including the Roman and Imperial Forums, the Palatine Hill, the Coliseum, the Pantheon, Caracalla's Bath, and Hadrian's villa. Focusing on the Empire's public buildings (including markets, temples, basilicas, amphitheatres, circuses and aqueducts), students will study the pivotal role played by the Romans' revolutionary invention of concrete and their most advanced architecture developments with the arch, vault, and dome. The course will conclude with the rise of a new order in the Middle Ages, a time when Christians drew upon the legacy of Ancient Rome in building beautiful churches to posterity; and a survey of the ways in which Roman innovations in design and technology have continued to assert influence into the modern age.

ART 215: Architecture of Renaissance Venice (1500-1600)

3.00 Credits

At the dawn of the 16th Century, Venice was at the height of its wealth and power as the strategic and political center of northern Italy, the leading port to Europe, and a gateway to the Levant. During the High Renaissance, Venice and Veneto (its surrounding region) were home to remarkable cultural and architectural innovations. Arguably the most important architect of this brilliant age was Andrea Palladio (1508-1580). His design projects, inspired by the ancient Romans, were all constructed in the Venetian Republic; but his legacy can be seen throughout the world. Among the greatest examples of Palladian architecture may be counted Wren's St. Paul's Cathedral (London), Jefferson's Monticello (Charlottesville), and even the US Capitol. This seminar will focus on the development of Palladio's style in his churches, palaces and especially villas, and the enduring legacy of both his influential writings and his timelessly elegant design. It will draw upon the superb collection of works from the Italian Renaissance at the National Gallery of Art.

ART 221: The Enlightenment and the Modern World

3.00 Credits

An illustrated interdisciplinary introduction to art, history, and culture from the age of Enlightenment to the modern world. Emphasis on the varying conceptions of the individual, society, nature, and the divine as seen through the masterpieces of art and literature, as well as contemporary politics, and reigning philosophic and scientific theories.

ART 229: Cell Phone Photography

3.00 Credits

With the ever-present cell phone comes the practiced use of the built-in camera feature. ART 229, Cell Phone Photography, explores the possibilities of the phone as the modern day camera. Having the camera present at all times allows for the documentation of everyday life and the idea that art and imagery are all around you. This course will heighten student's sensory skills, leading to better images and opening up a new form of photography. With the cell phone and the use of the computer, students will create new art forms based upon assignments given to them specifically to be photographed in day-to-day situations. Students will acquire photographic skills in composition, computer rendering techniques in such programs as Photoshop and will create imagery suitable for internet and gallery display. No prerequisites are necessary. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 230: Smart Phone Filmmaking

3.00 Credits

SMART FILMMAKING ON SMART PHONES ( or just SMART PHONE FILMMAKING) The best camera is the one you've got with you -- that's what still photographers like to say, but it's also becoming more and more relevant to daring independent filmmakers, and anyone who likes to use the video capability of their phone. In 2005, the first feature length film was made on a mobile phone and indie filmmakers around the world took careful note. Smart phones like the iPhone 6 shoot very high quality video, have customized tripods, lenses, and apps; they record remarkably good quality sound and can be modified to record with professional microphones. Every year smart phone video technology improves and more and more customized filmmaking tools are added by developers. But you'd be surprised what you can accomplish with just the basic tools -- you, your phone, and some editing software. During six intensive classes this course will help you improve your skills working with your own smart phone and make videos that will catch the attention even of skeptics. Students need to supply their own smart phone with video capabilities.

ART 231: Introduction to Digital Design: Motion Graphics & Graphic Design

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide a survey of the role of the computer in contemporary art and design. Students will receive basic training on the primary types of software and peripherals with which digital artists and designers must be familiar. This includes photo manipulation and compositing with Photoshop, text and vector illustration with Illustrator, publication layout design with InDesign, and motion graphics and animation with After Effects. Students will be encouraged to develop creative approaches to projects coupled with increased technical proficiency. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 232: Introduction to Digital Art: Photo-Manipulation and Digital Painting

3.00 Credits

This course concentrates on drafting, painting, masking and compositing features and capabilities using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Corel Painter. This course serves as a detailed introduction to the unparalleled possibilities for creating and manipulating images in digital formats. Students will learn and master the use of basic tools, multiple-step techniques, digital asset and workflow management along with an overall review of fundamental concepts of visual art and design. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 234: Sculpting Saints, Angels and Demons: Studio Figurative Sculpture in Clay

3.00 Credits

Tired of pushing a pencil? Try this soup-to-nuts introduction to modeling the figure in clay. Begin by mastering plasticine techniques while sculpting a gargoyle. Then, using the life model as a guide, explore the expressiveness of the human body with a series of clay figure studies, based on various saints. Then create a 25' completed figure-sculpture as a final project. Students will become acquainted with historical approaches to sculpting and religious sculpture, and discover their inner Michaelangelos. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 235: Introduction to 3-D Sculpting

3.00 Credits

Learn how to go from digital to tangible and back again! In this course we will design 3-D sculptures on the computer, build them in real life, and recreate existing 3-D spaces in a digital world. We will also be designing sculptures to be printed via a 3-D digital printer. This course requires no previous computer experience, and will take place in both the computer lab and sculpture studio.

ART 236: Time Based Media

3.00 Credits

This course will expose students to a broad range of both commercial and artistic works: from conventional film and video, to video installation, performance documentation, generative and interactive works. Students will get hands-on experience with a variety of commercial software packages, such as Adobe Premiere for video editing and Adobe After Effects for motion graphics and animation, in addition to various open-source tools. Projects directly engage contemporary forms of media such as Hollywood, television and YouTube, allowing students to think critically and creatively about these mediums.

ART 251: CUA @ the National Gallery of Art

3.00 Credits

Why do artists like Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Albrecht Dürer continue to demand our attention across five centuries and from an ocean away? Find out by coming face to face with Italian and Northern Renaissance masterworks at the National Gallery of Art! The course is arranged chronologically and by region to allow students to understand how artistic trends and specific artworks fit within broader social and cultural contexts, especially as they relate to issues of patronage. We will examine paintings, prints, and sculpture, and related literary sources and contemporary responses to appreciate how these works and their makers were understood in their own time, and to see how past authors have shaped modern concepts concerning this historic period. The National Gallery of Art is a destination for visitors from the world over; take this preeminent museum as your classroom -- you're only four Metro stops away! All class meetings will take place in the NGA galleries and research facilities.

ART 252: CUA@NGA: In Depth Modern Art from Edouard Manet to Salvador Dali

3.00 Credits

Study firsthand the paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings at the National Gallery of Art. Class meetings take place in the NGA galleries and research facilities.

ART 253: Art of Mary at the National Gallery

3.00 Credits

Mary, the mother of Jesus, is perhaps the most painted woman in history. Her image is the inspiration behind much of western spirituality and devotion. This course will explore the rich and complex nature of Marian art and iconography through an in-depth analysis of works from the Gallery's permanent collection. Objects to be discussed include major works of Byzantine and medieval art as well as masterpieces by Giotto, Duccio, Botticelli, Raphael, Van Eyck, Durer, Rembrandt and Tiepolo. Class meetings take place in the museum's galleries and research facilities.

ART 271: Introduction to Ceramic Art

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 272: Survey of American Art, 1600-1913

3.00 Credits

This course surveys American art and culture from early colonial encounters with Native Americans to the introduction of vanguard modernism at the Armory Show in 1913. Our approach will be to employ primary source material and historic interpretations to situate the visual practices and artistic styles of these periods within their social and cultural contexts. Among the topics we will consider are portraiture and the self, picturing war and national identity, race and representation, and European influences on American art. Particular attention will be paid to the role that artistic production and consumption played in constructing social identity and culture from the 18th century across the long nineteenth century.

ART 301: Splendors of Byzantium: Art and Culture of the Empire, 330-1453

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the visual culture of Byzantine Empire from the founding of Constantinople in A.D. 330 to the 15th century. The class will use the resources of Dumbarton Oaks Museum, which holds one of the most important collections of Early Christian and Byzantine art in North America. We will experience first hand the objects in the collection, including mosaics, metalwork, ivories, textiles, icon paintings, and illuminated manuscripts from a variety of contexts, secular and ecclesiastical, private and public. Through a number of case studies we will think and talk about forms of visual expression in Byzantium and their use in the shaping and reproduction of main cultural and social structures.

ART 302: Death, Art & the Afterlife

3.00 Credits

This course will explore Greek and Roman conceptions of death and afterlife, and their expression in funerary art and architecture from the early Archaic period through Late Antiquity. The course will examine rituals such as cremation, inhumation, funerary processions and other mourning and commemorative practices, as well as various types of burial markers and monuments, including stelai, urns, ossuaries, sarcophagi, catacomb paintings, and chamber tombs. Decorative imagery, inscriptions, and tomb structures will be studied from various perspectives as indicators of social status and cultural identity, gender and family structure, and beliefs about the afterlife. The dynamic effects of cross-cultural influence in Hellenistic Asia Minor and Roman Egypt will be investigated, as will the enduring impact of these ancient cosmologies and art forms on later cults and cultures, including Christianity in the later Roman period.

ART 303: Painting I

3.00 Credits

Elemental problems of painting on a two-dimensional surface; structure and composition, color, flat pattern, modeling and light, paint handling, and texture. Students work from varied life sources and imagination in oil. Studio, six hours per week. Open to concentrators and nonconcentrators; 303 is not a prerequisite for 304. Departmental approval required. Prerequisite 201, 202, 381 Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 304: Painting II

3.00 Credits

Elemental problems of painting on a two-dimensional surface; structure and composition, color, flat pattern, modeling and light, paint handling, and texture. Students work from varied life sources and imagination in oil. Studio, six hours per week. Open to concentrators and nonconcentrators; 303 is not a prerequisite for 304. Departmental approval required. Prerequisite 201, 202, 381 Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 305: Sculpture I

3.00 Credits

An introduction to various kinds of three-dimensional forms, an exploration of sculptural tools, materials, and techniques including carving, casting, and constructing, as well as a consideration of sculpture, sculptors and their history. 305 is not a prerequisite for 306. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 306: Sculpture II

3.00 Credits

An introduction to various kinds of three-dimensional forms, an exploration of sculptural tools, materials, and techniques including stone and wood carving, welded steel, and other media, as well as a consideration of sculpture, sculptors and their history. 305 is not a prerequisite for 306. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 307: Sculpture in Digital Space

3.00 Credits

Fuses sculptural media computer graphics to explore the "placement of sculpture" and "sculpture as place." While primarily a lab-based course, discussion includes consideration of environmental sculpture as well as the role of the artist in the creation of meaningfully designed public spaces. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 308: Metal Sculpture

3.00 Credits

The creation of welded steel and cast metal sculpture is the focus of this course. A study of the methods of construction and fabrication of metal sculpture as well as a survey of historical methods of making metal sculpture will be presented. This course may be repeated for credit. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 309: Introduction to Photography

3.00 Credits

Through lecture, lab, and independent projects, students are introduced to basic 35mm black-and-white photography techniques, darkroom developing and printing, the use of natural and artificial lighting, the history of photography, and contemporary theories and styles. A 35mm. SLR camera is required. No prerequisites. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 310: Introduction to Early Christian Art and Archaeology

3.00 Credits

An exploration of art, architecture, and material culture from the mid-3rd century through the 8th century AD, a time when the Christian faith grew from one of many practiced throughout the Roman world to an empire-wide state religion. This course will investigate Christian iconography's origins in the pagan and Jewish art of late antiquity, and the innovative visual forms that arose to express Christianity's new spiritual concepts. The dynamic effects of competing "heresies," iconoclasm, and the increasingly defined doctrines, rituals, and structures of the Church will be examined in relation to the visual arts, within the context of the political fracturing of the Roman Empire, the persistence of Greco-Roman cultural heritage, and the rise of Islam in the 7th century. Examples drawn from western Europe and the eastern Mediterranean region will include church architecture, wall paintings, mosaics, icons, sculptures, manuscripts, and objects in ivory, ceramic, and glass. Visits to Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C. and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore may be arranged.

ART 311: Byzantium & the West: Cultural and Artistic Exchange in Medieval Europe, c. 1000 ¿ 1300

3.00 Credits

This course will examine Eastern and Western cultural interaction in the High and Late Middle Ages. It will focus on the reception of Byzantine art in medieval Italy and transalpine Europe, and will include the Christian encounter with Islamic art and precious objects. It will examine these cross-cultural exchanges and the methodological approaches that scholars have developed in tracing the reception of Byzantine and Islamic imagery and objects. Among the themes that will be addressed: the circulation and afterlife of objects, the reception mechanisms of influence, appropriation, assimilation, and hybridity, Christian devotion in Byzantium and the West, social processes such as gift-giving, diplomacy, and the establishment of political ideologies.

ART 314: Art Concepts and Studio Skills

3.00 Credits

This course is required of Studio Art majors but is open to electors with no pre-requisite. Art History majors may take the course to satisfy an art elective. This is a studio/lecture class investigating concepts in contemporary art and basic practical studio skills. Current trends in contemporary art making will be investigated. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 315: Web Design and Development

3.00 Credits

Designed to give you real-world skills, this course focuses on communicating in the modern web-based economy. Using industry-standard best practices, we will work hands-on in groups and one-on-one to learn the ins and outs of successful web design. We will use HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, open source software and the Adobe Creative Suite to explore the information hierarchy; build responsive layouts for tablets and mobile; experiment with web typography, and deliver images for the web. This course assumes no prior design or software experience. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 317: Greek Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

Surveys the art, architecture, and archeology of Greece from its Minoan and Mycenaean antecedents through the late Hellenistic era, with emphasis on the Classical period. Readings and slide lectures/discussions emphasize the relationship of the arts to their broader cultural context and introduce a variety of art-historical methods.

ART 318: Roman Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

Surveys the art of the Roman Empire from its Etruscan origins (eighth century B.C.) until the age of Constantine (early fourth century A.D.). Examines city planning, architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts in Rome and its provinces in the context of political developments. Special emphasis on public and private patronage of funerary, religious, and commemorative (propagandistic) arts.

ART 318R: Roman Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

Surveys the art of the Roman Empire from its Etruscan origins (eighth century B.C.) until the age of Constantine (early fourth century A.D.). Examines city planning, architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts in Rome and its provinces in the context of political developments. Special emphasis on public and private patronage of funerary, religious, and commemorative (propagandistic) arts.

ART 319: Renaissance Art

3.00 Credits

A survey of key monuments, artists, patrons, and subjects of art from about 1300 to 1575 in Italy, with an emphasis on the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and Tuscany, Rome, and Venice. Works will be discussed in relation to the cultural, political, social, and/or technical circumstances in which they were made. Artists studied will include Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Mantegna, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian.

ART 320: Baroque Art

3.00 Credits

Features the painting and sculpture of such seventeenth century masters as Caravaggio, Rubens, Velasquez, Bernini, and Poussin. Replaces 553.

ART 321: Venetian Art

3.00 Credits

This course surveys visual arts and architecture emerging in the late fourteenth century to the late sixteenth century. It will explore the history of art not only in Venice, but also the Venetian Republic's other possessions: the domini di Terraferma, such as Padua, and its Stato da Mar, such as Crete. Rather than presuming a "Venetian" style defined in contrast to other centers of the Italian Renaissance, we will aim to understand regional and individual tendencies on their own terms. The course will present the canonical works of Venetian Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture, but it also aims to expand the scope of relevant items for art historical inquiry, covering material culture, manuscripts, and early printed books. The works themselves within a historic context will be the focus, including their means of production, the places for which these images were intended, the concerns of patrons and art collectors, and the expectations and responses of the works' first viewers.

ART 322: The Visual Culture of Renaissance Rome

3.00 Credits

A study of the art and culture of one of the most magnificent and powerful cities in history. Considers Rome in the 15th and 16th centuries as both a religious and political center, across a broad spectrum of life from the papacy to the local population. Addresses the impact of ancient Rome on the Renaissance, and how Rome shaped itself as a modern city. Examines the art and architecture of churches, palaces, and villas - including the treasures of St. Peter's and the Sistine Chapel -- in all aspects of artistic production, from paintings, frescoes, fountains, and sculptures, to urban planning and public festivals.

ART 323: Nineteenth Century Art:Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism

3.00 Credits

An illustrated survey of the art of the Nineteenth Century, one of the most dynamic periods in the development of Western culture. Considers some of the sweeping transformations that took place in art and society during the century and traces the rise of modern art in the painting, sculpture, and design of this vital turbulent age. Artists discussed include David, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Friedrich, Goya, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Cassatt, Monet, and Renoir. Replaces 563; see also 331, which partially replaces 563 and 462.

ART 324: Realism, Impressionism, and the Birth of Modernism

3.00 Credits

A focused, illustrated study of two brilliant movements in modern art history through the work of some of the greatest artists of the mid-to-late nineteenth century, including Millet, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Renoir, and Rodin. Addresses the innovative production of these artists in relation to the tumultuous cultural and political circumstances of the late 1800s. Explores the pivotal influence of Realism and Impressionism upon the development of Vanguard Modernism. Students are encouraged to utilize the outstanding resources of local art collections. Readings, illustrated lectures, class discussions, and field trips to local collections.

ART 325: Rococo to Romanticism

3.00 Credits

Examines the Neoclassical and Romantic movements in Western art and culture from 1750 to 1850. Charts the impact of the Academie, the role of classical art and its early tradition, and the rise of the avant garde. Artists to be studied include David, Goya, Gericault, Delacroix, Constable, Turner and Friedrich.

ART 326: American Art and Culture: From the Colonial Period to the Civil War

3.00 Credits

Surveys American artistic and cultural expression from the Colonial Period to the end of the Civil War. Introduces American painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts, photography, and graphic work in a broad social and historical context, including the work of Copley, Cole, Bierstadt, Brady, Greenough, Jefferson, and the Peale Family.

ART 327: Rome, the Eternal City

3.00 Credits

No city in the world has an urban fabric so rich in historical layers and dense in historic monuments as Rome. As the heart of the ancient Roman empire, a major Christian pilgrimage destination, the seat of the papacy, and the capital of the modern nation of Italy, Rome has been the site of extraordinary urban development and artistic patronage for more than two millennia. This course surveys the topography and urbanism of Rome from its ancient origins to the present. We will examine the built environment in the largest sense of the term: architecture and urban planning in particular, but also other art forms that played a role in the defining the geography of the city, including sculpture, painting, and mosaic. The objective is to understand not only the formal qualities of Rome's great monuments, but also how they functioned, both individually and collectively, in relation to the changing social and cultural conditions of the city. In tracing this history, we will utilize literary descriptions and maps, prints, and drawings depicting Rome in the past in concert with imagery of the city as it appears today.

ART 328: The Art and Literature of Paris

3.00 Credits

This course offers an introduction to the art, literature, history, and culture of the City of Lights. Through field trips, assigned readings, class discussions, and on-site visits to a selection of the city's many splendid sacred sites, magnificent museums, and historic monuments, students will encounter the history and culture of one of the world's most venerable and beautiful capitals. Particular attention will be paid to art works and texts that have helped to define French culture and style throughout the ages.

ART 329: Introduction Digital Photography and Photoshop

3.00 Credits

Introduces the basics of photography as well as an introduction to, Adobe Photoshop. Students will utilize and apply basic methods of image capture, rendering techniques, and manipulation of images to produce a body of work to be presented as a portfolio at the end of the semester. A digital SLR is required. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 330: Rembrandt Van Rijn: His Paintings and Graphic works

3.00 Credits

Enlightened entrepreneur, bankrupted spendthrift, brilliant teacher, grumpy curmudgeon, loving husband and father, and artistic genius -- Rembrandt's life reveals a man whose character was as complex and dramatic as his massive oeuvre. This course will explore the life and work of the most celebrated artist of the Dutch Golden Age. In-depth analyses of paintings, engravings, etchings, and drawings will be supplemented by close readings of art historical scholarship with an emphasis on the methods used to understand contemporaneous Dutch art. The exemplary collection of Rembrandt's work in the National Gallery of Art will serve as a vital resource.

ART 331: Modern Art: From Post-Impressionism to Modernism (1880s-1945)

3.00 Credits

Surveys European and American art and art theory from the last Impressionist exhibitions through the rise of Fauvism, Expressionism, Dadaism, and Cubism. Examines the pioneering production of early Modernist artists such as Ce'zanne, Van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, Kandinsky, Mondrian, and Duchamp, whose innovative work addressed the problems of the modern condition and transformed the very boundaries of artistic expression. Replaces in part both 563 and 462.

ART 332: Contemporary Art (1945-Present)

3.00 Credits

A study of European and American art and art theory from 1945 to the present. Examines the major movements of High Modernism and Post-Modernism (including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Performance Art, Minimalism, and Appropriation) in relation to biographical and formal concerns, contemporary social and political conditions, and current art history debates. Replaces in part 462; see also 331.

ART 333: Digital Applications for Fine Arts

3.00 Credits

This new course is designed to enhance the fine arts studio experience by introducing progressive digital drawing and painting tools, and lifelike natural digital media and materials in a studio format. Students will create a portfolio of digital images from models, found objects, and their own imagination as they explore the amazing virtual tools and materials that state-of-the-art digital media has to offer. For the contemporary fine artist, these cutting-edge programs (including Corel Painter, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop) provide an amazing array of flexible and expressive possibilities, including virtual dry media mark makers: pens, pencils, charcoal and pastels; digital wet media: oils, watercolors and inks; virtual surfaces and substrates; and dynamic light control. This digital studio course is designed to complement the hands-on studio experience, opening new dynamic, creative directions for the student, facilitating the integration of dynamically evolving new media platforms and artistic self-expression. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 334: History of Photography

3.00 Credits

This course traces the history of photography from its invention in 1839 to the present. Students will learn the technical aspects of photography, including the various types of photographs produced. Students will also learn about the different types of photographic practices, from portraiture to documentation and will see the most important works of the major photographic artists from the 19th and 20th centuries. Finally, the course will examine the development of photography as an artistic practice with its own critical history.

ART 335: Western Medieval Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

Surveys the art and architecture of the Middle Ages in Western Europe, from the age of Charlemagne through the Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, and from England to the borders of the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. Slide lectures, readings, and discussions consider secular and vernacular art forms in addition to art created for the use and glory of the Christian church.

ART 336: Seventeenth Century Dutch Painting

3.00 Credits

This course will explore Dutch art and culture in its Golden Age. The innovations of Rembrandt, Jan Steen, Pieter Saenredam, and Jan Vermeer among other remarkable artist. They will be investigated in relation to the disappearance of traditional patronage systems, the rise of a new middle class, and the impact of ongoing religious turmoil. Course will touch upon the exemplary Dutch collections in the National Gallery of Art.

ART 337: Method and Materials in Painting

3.00 Credits

An introduction to various kinds of paintings materials, and techniques with a emphasis on acrylics. Assignments will be from varied life sources and the imagination. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 338: Love and Ecstasy in Renaissance Art

3.00 Credits

Love, lust, and desire spiritual, secular, and physical were among the dominant themes in Renaissance art and literature. In this course, we will examine the ways in which artists, poets, theologians, and philosophers struggled to define, and to represent, the complexities of love in all its facets. We will analyze the thematics of desire in male and female portraiture and mythological paintings, the erotics of mysticism in altarpieces, the role of love and friendship in Neoplatonic philosophy, and the taboos of sex in early modern printmaking. Artists to be studied include: Leonardo da Vinci, Fra Bartolommeo, Bronzino, Michelangelo, Titian, Correggio, and Lorenzo Lotto.

ART 339: Intermediate Photography

3.00 Credits

Art 339 is an intermediate level studio art course intended for students who wish to further their creative abilities using contemporary photographic techniques. Students will be challenged to improve their technical skills and artistic vision through hands-on practice, lectures and demonstrations. An emphasis is placed on student led critiques and critical conversation-reflecting the increasingly social and collaborative nature of photography. A digital SLR or mirrorless camera is required. See requisites. Students with equivalent experience may enroll with department consent. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 340: Heroic & Holy: Powerful Women in Art

3.00 Credits

This course is a study of the development of the cult and iconography of the Virgin Mary from early Christianity to the beginning of the Renaissance with an emphasis on Byzantine art. It examines the religious, political, and social forces that made the Virgin Mary a potent intercessor and a widely represented subject in Christian art. Through the lens of Marian art, the course focuses on a number of topics and issues that are at the heart of art history, such as the question of image and icon, originals and copies, assimilation and influence, materiality, and iconography among others. Field trips to local museums will include the National Museum of Women in the Arts and the National Gallery of Art. Replaces 520.

ART 341: Islamic Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

This course examines Islamic art and architecture of the Mediterranean during the period between the rise of Islam and the expansion of the Ottoman Empire (7th-16th c.). It focuses mainly on the patronage of a succession of dynasties in major urban centers, on regions circling the Mediterranean, from the Iberian Peninsula to Syria. Slide lectures, readings, and discussions consider religious, secular and vernacular art forms. By examining the cultural, religious, political, and socio- economic contexts within which Islamic art and architecture developed, the course will provide an understanding of its major themes and regional variations.

ART 342: Introduction to Web Design

3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to the art of creating well designed websites. Students will learn skills, tools and techniques needed for real-world website design and by course's end will have an understanding of HTML and general website development using Dreamweaver, Photoshop & Flash. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 343: Introduction to Sound Production and Design

3.00 Credits

Cross-listed with Media Studies. This course introduces students to creative audio recording, mixing and mastering skills, as well as professional-grade applications of the techniques on campus, in the workplace, and at home. Focused on teaching audio recording fundamentals such as proper microphone selection, placement and usage; creative application of audio effects in postproduction; painting a picture with audio, and creating storyboards, this course will also concentrate on the history of recording & recording technologies; recording personnel & duties; legal aspects of sound production, and the role of the creative process in the world of constantly emerging technologies. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 344: Multimedia Art Using Final Cut Pro

3.00 Credits

Introduces students to the basics of digital multimedia, video editing, storyboarding, and much more. Using powerful Mac G5 computers and industry standard Final Cut Pro software, students will learn how to find and use inspiration from almost any source. Students will create audio and video collages; create titles in Photoshop, and engage in creative exercises using Found Art, digital images and photos, as well as public domain audio and video from the 1930s through the 1960s. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 345: Art and Power

3.00 Credits

Examines the relationship between art and power. Power may be in the hands of individuals, cities, specific social groups or classes, or religious institutions; these frequently create, consolidate, and expand their hold on power through the influential media of the visual arts and architecture. Considers how city planning, buildings, architectural decoration, portable arts, costume, and spectacle (including liturgy) have contributed to the discourses of power in medieval history.

ART 346: Art, Religion and Magic in Renaissance and Baroque Italy

3.00 Credits

This course explores Renaissance and Baroque beliefs in the power of images to transform their beholders. The idea that images might produce profound mental and physical changes in viewers was widely articulated in the period 1450 to 1650. They might soothe a troubled soul, create healthy and beautiful bodies, and mitigate physical suffering. This course will consider varied types of images, including miraculous images, and magical images, their functions and their efficacy. How did images heal the sick, cheer distressed or melancholic beholders, or transform the physical appearance of their beholders? To what extent did the expectations of efficacy attaching to paintings differ from other forms of talismanic images? Among the questions this course will consider: how did artists approach the creation of images with such expectations in mind? And knowing that their paintings were supposed to transform, how did they address specific audiences (male vs. female, for example)?

ART 347: Northern Renaissance Art: From Van Eyck to Bruegel

3.00 Credits

The fifteenth and sixteenth centuries were a period of intense artistic innovation not only in Italy, but also North of the Alps. This course explores the distinct visual culture of the Low Countries (modern Belgium and the Netherlands) and Germany from the time of Jan Eyck, whose stunning depiction of mundane beauty aimed to uncover the world's divine order, to that of Pieter Bruegel the Elder, whose painting of reveling peasants and of the unusual topic broke with established conventions. Another focus will be the emergence of the medium of print, particularly the extraordinary works of Albrecht Durer, and its central role for artistic exchange in the period.

ART 348: European Art Between the World Wars

3.00 Credits

This course examines European art of the interwar period in the context of nationalist and totalitarian ideologies and the struggle between tradition and modernity. We will study the critical role of the political and cultural discourse of the Right and the Left during the interwar period, a time in which Capitalism, Marxism and Fascism came to full fruition. We will consider in depth the important 1937 exhibitions at the World's Fair in Paris and Hitler's Degenerate Art in Munich, as well as the art and propaganda produced between the first and second worlds in France, Spain, Germany, Italy and the Soviet Union. Futurism, New Objectivity, the Return to Order, and Soviet Realism will all be considered in the context of nation-building strategies, as will the art and politics of the Spanish Civil War.

ART 349: Art and Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 350: Symbolic Sites: Monuments, Memorials, and Memories

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 351: Museum Studies

3.00 Credits

This course focuses on museum display as a form of multi-dimensional, interactive media. It will offer an in-depth look at exhibition creation from inception to display. Readings, field trips, guest speakers, and in-class discussions will explore the dynamic relationship between museum visitors, collections, and public and private spaces, including innovative applications of technology, essential conservation principles, and advances in enhanced accessibility. The class is designed to draw upon the wealth of museum resources in the Washington area.

ART 351A: Gallery Practices: Curating, Installing, Interpreting and Publicizing Exhibitions

3.00 Credits

Gallery Practices is composed of three main components - curatorial research and practice, exhibition design, and public-out-reach and network building through traditional and new media communication platforms. Students will attain the primary research skills needed to interpret the work of both living and historic artists through applied interview techniques and secondary research. Strategies for effective exhibition design will be explored with a current practitioner, and through direct observation and analysis of various types of art exhibitions, ranging from non-profit galleries to museums. The public communication component will include a focus on graphic design, public interpretation (wall-label, brochure, catalogue, MP3, and web-mounted texts), and public out-reach through multiple platforms (including press-release statements, and interactive social media). In this hands-on course, students will develop and design an exhibition.

ART 352: Arts & Culture Reporting

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 353: Junior Studio Art Seminar

3.00 Credits

Junior Studio Art Seminar introduces studio art majors to advanced independent work. This seminar will include field trips, readings and discussions of contemporary art, art criticism, and the role of historical events and cultural values in the production and reception of art. Each student will produce an independently conceived project in preparation for the Junior Exhibition.

ART 354: American Pop Art in the 1960's

3.00 Credits

When Pop Art burst onto the American art scene in the early 1960's, it constituted a profound challenge to prevailing definitions of high culture through its introduction of the imagery and style of mass culture-pin-ups, comic books, advertisements, etc.-into the realm of fine art. In this course we will examine the initial controversy provoked by the movement through an exploration of the work of artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and James Rosenquist, as well as the writings of early critics who attacked-or defended-their work. In order to understand the controversy provoked by the movement, we will also look closely at its historical context. The post-World War II socio-economic boom let to heated debates about the interrelationship of class, taste, and culture; these debates were exacerbated by the emergence of Camp and a youth-oriented mass culture by the mid-1960s. In conclusion we will examine the legacy of Pop: its pioneering of post-modernist themes and artistic practices, as well as its impact on subsequent artistic theory. The class will be taught in a mixed lecture/seminar format: brief lectures will introduce each topic, followed by in-depth discussion of critical readings and works of art.

ART 355: Art and Devotion

3.00 Credits

The fifteenth century saw the rise of a mystic piety, which focused on direct personal engagement with holy figures and the recreation of the sights and sensations of biblical events in one's own mind. The increasing fascination with spiritual vision on the one hand, and a rising interest in the close observation of the natural world on the other led to an art that celebrated physical vision and material beauty as manifestations of the divine. This course explores the role of art in both public liturgy and private devotional practice, focusing on the work of Netherlandish artists such as Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, and Hieronymus Bosch. After the Protestant Reformation, the traditional liturgical and devotional functions of religious art were called into question. Artists like Albrecht Dürer, Joachim Patinir, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, creating images for both Catholic and Protestant patrons, had to navigate a more diverse confessional culture, and religious images began to serve as exempla and focal points for moral reflection in an increasingly complex world.

ART 356: Topics in 17th Century Art: Artemisia Gentileschi & Caravaggio

3.00 Credits

This course examines the lives and art of two seventeenth-century Italian painters, whose dramatic biographies have often informed, and sometimes overshadowed, the interpretation of their art. Caravaggio and Artemisia are beloved by scholars and the public alike, and have been the subjects of intense study in recent years. Their careers are exemplary of the many social, economic, cultural and psychological obstacles contemporary artists faced, and of the methods by which they overcame these in the pursuit of artistic achievement, livelihood and fame. The following are among the many questions this course will consider: to what extent did the artist's personal experience necessarily inform his/her art, and what other historical forces may have conditioned it? How did Artemisia assimilate stylistic innovations first introduced by Caravaggio, and how did she subsequently develop a style of painting that enabled her to compete with male painters? Why have these two artists come to dominate the study of Italian Baroque art and what can they tell us about the nature of artistic culture in this period?

ART 357: DaDa & Surrealism

3.00 Credits

A focused study of two prominent movements in early twentieth-century Western art. Examines the innovative production of visual and literary artists in all media, including painting, sculpture, film, photography, objects, publications, poems, and novels. Featured artists include: Marcel Duchamp, Salvador Dali, Max Ernst, Man Ray, Joan Miro, Hannah Hoch, Kurt Schwitters, Picasso, Picabia, Rene Magritte, Alberto Giacometti, Dorothea Tanning, Kay Sage, and Yves Tanguy. Through readings, slide lectures, class discussion, and field trips to local museums, students will investigate the remarkable variety of creative responses to a turbulent and fascinating era in European history.

ART 358: The Cult of Saints in Medieval Europe

3.00 Credits

From the earliest days of Christianity, certain holy men and women were dubbed saints and their bones, the places where they died, and the stories of their lives were given special status and became the focus of artistic activity. This course will focus on the art and architecture produced in the service of the cult the saints, and will cover not only major architectural monuments and richly decorated reliquaries and manuscripts, but also the smaller, more humble keepsakes made for the pilgrims who visited the shrines. The monuments discussed will be primarily western European, but non-Western saints and pilgrimage activities, particularly Byzantine and Islamic, will receive some attention. In addition to art-historical literature, students will read some medieval texts including saints' Lives and first-hand accounts of pilgrimage. No previous coursework in art history is required, but some familiarity with medieval studies will be helpful.

ART 359: Painting: Symbolism and Metaphor

3.00 Credits

In this class we will examine and explore not only the history of symbolism and metaphor in art from the past but also what can be interpreted as modern symbolism. As the class progresses students will begin to establish their own symbolic iconography. The ultimate goal is that by establishing a 'language' the individual can express his or her own personal visual narrative with unique individuality. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 360: Sculptural Self Portraits

3.00 Credits

In this class you will create literal and figurative self portraits using plaster, cast bronze, and mixed media. We will study how different cultures have used the self-portrait and how different artist over time have represented themselves. No prerequisites. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 361: Junior Art History Seminar

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 362: Making Your Mark: Experimental Drawing

3.00 Credits

Explore all the possibilities of making marks in an experimental drawing course that will explode all notions of what a drawing can be. Designed for beginning through advanced students, this studio class will push the limits of expressive form through a series of demonstrations, lectures, assignments, and the maintenance of experimental sketchbooks. Emphasis will be placed on finding a personal voice, and exploring the relationship between subject matter and chosen media. Students will be taught traditional drawing techniques and media, but will also be encouraged to experiment with unconventional methods such as embroidery, scratching, burning, and the use of materials such as glitter, beauty products, insect prints, and stains from everyday liquids. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 363: Liturgical Sculpture: A Studio Exploration of the Sacred and Profane

3.00 Credits

Open to beginning and advanced students. Working from the imagination and life models, students will explore figurative sculpture from gargoyles to saints in this studio sculpture class. Brief lectures will illustrate and analyze approaches to liturgical sculpture through history. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 364: Advanced Multimedia Art Using Final Cut Pro

3.00 Credits

Continuing on ART 344, students will apply their new skills to incorporate advanced multimedia compositing techniques; color correction; nesting, rendering and delivery for the Internet, as well as creating portfolio-friendly segments such as "man in the street" interviews, multimedia journals and community-based CUA projects. Prerequisite: ART 344 or Departmental Permission. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 365: Selected Topics in Eighteenth-, Nineteenth-, and Twentieth-Century Art

3.00 Credits

An illustrated study of art history and criticism through a focused consideration of selected artists, art movements, periods, and issues from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Subject for each term will be announced in advance. (Course may be repeated with varied content and instructor's permission.) Selected topics include Manet and Modern Paris; Women in Impressionism; The Landscape Tradition.

ART 366: The Legacy of Lincoln: American Art and Culture from 1809 to 1930

3.00 Credits

An in-depth exploration of American art and culture during and after the Age of Lincoln, beginning in 1809, the year of Lincoln's birth, and culminating with the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s. The focus of the course will be the visual arts,painting, sculpture, and photography, but we will also read important literary works and learn how original forms of American music and art developed during and after the Civil War in response to Lincoln's vision of human liberty and the reconstruction of a democratic and united states of America. Topics include: the work of artists whose careers and artistic production were affected by the Civil War and Reconstruction; the invention of photography and its use during the Civil War; the conquest and settlement of the west and its effect on landscape painting and the formation of a national identity; and the Harlem Renaissance, an artistic and literary movement based in New York, whose creative and intellectual production was a response to the continued exclusion of African American artists from mainstream cultural, economic, and political institutions that had marked the 19th century and continued in the 20th century. Visits to Washington art museums and monuments are an integral part of the course.

ART 367: Van Gogh and His Circle

3.00 Credits

An illustrated study of the art, life, and legacy of Vincent van Gogh, the nineteenth century Dutch painter whose tragic life story and brilliant artistic production have assumed almost mythic proportions in modern Western culture. Considers the relationship of van Gogh's work to that of his contemporaries in Europe, as well as the unique contribution that his painting has made to the development of vanguard Modernism. Also investigates the relationship between biography and historiography in the formulation of van Gogh's popular image as a tormented visionary genius whose evocative and poignant painting was marked (if not also motivated) by suffering and despair.

ART 368: Michelangelo, Leonardo and Raphael

3.00 Credits

This seminar will examine the historic life and remarkable work of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo Buonarroti, and Raphael Santi, arguably the three most consequential figures in Western Art. We will focus on the significant relationship, and sometime rivalry, between these figures. We will also evaluate the dynamic theoretical, theological, philosophical, political, and economic contexts from which masterworks like the Last Supper, Sistine Ceiling, and Vatican Stanze emerged. Furthermore, we will examine these artists' seminal roles in shaping many of the notions we associate with the modern artist, including concepts such as artistic genius and subjectivity. Throughout the seminar, students will approach the material critically coming to terms with issues of historical interpretation itself.

ART 369: The Problem of the "Modern Manner": Italian Art from Bellini to Raphael

3.00 Credits

This course will examine works produced by Leonardo and his followers in the cities of Milan, Venice, Parma, Florence and Rome from circa 1480 to 1530. Works of art will be discussed in relationship to the historical, political, social and cultural contexts in which they were created. Particular focus will be given to issues of patronage, reception and historiography.

ART 370: Selected Problems in Chinese and Japanese Art

3.00 Credits

Special topics in painting, ceramics, sculpture, and graphics of selected periods of Chinese and Japanese art history. Formerly 582.

ART 371: Modern Manner: Italian Art from Bellini to Rapael

3.00 Credits

This course will examine works produced by such Italian artists as Leonardo, Giorgione, Bellini, Titian, Correggio, Raphael and Michelangelo in the cities of Milan, Venice, Parma, Florence and Rome from circa 1480 to 1530. The course will trace the formation of the modern manner (maniera moderna) or the High Renaissance style, assessing the role that these artists played in the creation of this new artistic sensibility. It will also discuss how each of these artists developed an individual style. Works of art will be discussed in relationship to the historical, political, social and cultural contexts in which they were created. Particular focus will be given to issues of patronage, reception and historiography.

ART 372: American Art and Culture: From the Age of Discovery to the Age of Lincoln

3.00 Credits

Surveys American artistic and cultural expression from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War. Introduces American painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts, photography, and graphic work in a broad social and historical context. Includes the work of Copley, the Peale family, Jefferson, Cole, Durand, Bierstadt, Caitlin, Leutze, Greenough, Powers, Brady and Gardner.

ART 373: Art and Spirituality: Making and Meaning in Medieval Italy 1100 - 1400

3.00 Credits

This course focuses on the creation and meaning of medieval Italian art, paying particular attention to technique and display. We will examine a wide range of visual material in a variety of media such as sculpted portals, tombs and pulpits, illuminated manuscripts, painted panels, frescoed chapels and enameled reliquaries. This will include consideration of settings and space; the decisions made by both artists and patrons; and audiences. Consideration will be given also to the development of new types of images in relation to the cult of the saints and the rise of new religious orders, particularly the Franciscans and the Dominicans. Making use of works in local art collections, special attention will be devoted to panel painting and the various functions panels served within the medieval church as well as issues related to their display within the modern museum. The course includes visits to the National Gallery of Art and the Walters Art Museum.

ART 374: How to Survive the Bomb: Art, Music, and Literature in the 1950s

3.00 Credits

By 1950, the Cold War was in full swing and fear of nuclear annihilation was increasingly palpable. This course will examine how artists explicitly and implicitly addressed the political, cultural, and ethical implications of this situation. Beginning with the abstract art of the Abstract Expressionists, and working our way through the Beat poets, the musical compositions of John Cage and Morton Feldman, and jazz, the cryptic, collage-like works of Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, the figuration of Larry Rivers, the performance-based Happenings of Allan Kaprow, as well as photography and film, we will consider the variety of ways that artists responded to the fear and repression of the Cold War. We will read a variety of texts ranging from artists' writings, literature, contemporary criticism, and scholarly accounts to gain a better understanding of the artistic diversity of the 1950s.

ART 375: Rethinking the Renaissance: Artistic Exchange Between North and South

3.00 Credits

This course examines art made between ca. 1400-1600 that has traditionally been described as belonging to the Italian Renaissance (that is, art made on the Italian peninsula)and to the 'Northern Renaissance' (that is, art made in what is today the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Germany and Austria). While these two subjects are often taught as separate historical and artistic phenomena, this course will consider possible alternatives to this prevalent model. By focusing on artists and art works that traveled in both directions across the Alps, students will have the chance to consider a more inclusive definition of the Renaissance.

ART 376: Advanced Studio Art Practice

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 381: Figure Drawing

3.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to creating drawings based on observing a range of artist's models. The focus of the class is to develop a sensitivity to the structure, anatomy and expressive qualities of the human form in a variety of ways. Through concentrated in-class life studies, creative, personalized projects, and class critiques, students will discover new ways to render the human figure with confidence. Historic and contemporary references will broaden the students' understanding of the figure as an exciting part of visual language. Prerequisite: Beginning Drawing, or permission of the instructor. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 382: Figure Painting

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to build upon students' abilities to render the human form and to hone their visual problem solving skills. The focus of the class is to increase technical abilities of the students so that they may more confidently express themselves in a two dimensional form with both drawing and painting media. Through concentrated in-class life studies, projects, and class critiques, students will foster new ways to render the human figure with confidence. The course approaches the techniques in a cumulative manner. It begins with simple line studies and ends with the glazing techniques used by the Old Masters. The course is open to beginning through intermediate drawing and painting students. Students should have taken one of the following prerequisites: 201 or 202 or 381, or may enroll in the course with the Instructor's permission. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 383: Video Production

3.00 Credits

This course offers a practical introduction to the creative and technical skills needed for producing videos, a basic survival skill for the internet age. It will feature dynamic field production and post-production exercises, culminating in the realization of a short video. Students will learn the basics of all crafts required in video production from inception and development of an idea to writing a proposal, storyboarding, planning and executing a shoot, recording audio, use of music, and editing your work into a short piece for upload on Vimeo or YouTube. Students will become familiar with the professional language of film practices, as well as how to critique works of video. Course will be offered in the Art Department's advanced Apple lab, employing Go-Pro and Canon video cameras, featuring the latest editing hardware and software, including Apple Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere.

ART 384: Digital Photography and Dynamic Narrative

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the process of documentary and fictional storytelling through visual, audio, and time-based elements. Students will learn the visual narrative process, as well as audio recording and editing techniques that enhance the visual narrative. Final projects will include the presentation of a completed photo story with a coordinated audio component. Students will use Adobe Photoshop, Audacity and Soundslides. 35mm camera required. Previous photography experience is preferred but not required. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 385: Screen Printing

3.00 Credits

This cross-platform course that combines traditional printmaking process and new media techniques, is designed to explore dynamic and adaptable screen-printing methods, materials and techniques to transform digitally generated imaging into original hand printed art work. The course will introduce and review software applications and digital tools currently available, for the purpose of generating high quality photo-stencils that can translate effectively visual information through screens into a variety of materials.This course is also an opportunity for the fine art student to explore the possibilities and potential of integrating screen-printed imagery, textures, and ideas into painting as unique works or as serial projects.

ART 386: Introduction to 3D Modeling and Animation

3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to basic concepts when working with motion graphics and 3D space and its various industry applications. Adobe After Effects and the open source software package Blender will be used to create 3-D still renderings and short animated sequences. Students' focus is on three-dimensional modeling and basic animation techniques, with an emphasis on creativity, originality and experimentation.

ART 390: A World Filled with Gods: Pagan, Jewish, Christian and Muslim Art in Late Antiquity

3.00 Credits

Between the first and the eighth centuries, two new religions, Christianity and Islam, joined the Jewish and Greco-Roman religions. In this course, we will investigate the war of images during this critical period of intercultural transformation and change in the Mediterranean world. We will examine how old and new religions both competed and communicated via art and architecture. Through a number of case studies, we will investigate forms of visual expression in late antiquity; and we will consider how images of the divine functioned to shape and reinforce cultural and social structures.

ART 395: Intermediate to Advanced Screen Printing

3.00 Credits

This hands-on studio and cross-platform course is designed as a complement to basic introduction to screen-printing courses Art-365/685. It is a project design and implementation course intended to give the intermediate to advanced student of screen-printing and digital media the opportunity to continue to master both digital compositing methods as well as studio printmaking process. The project based studio format will facilitate the exploration of integration of traditional printmaking process and new media technique, and will encourage the experimentation with sustainable water-based screen-printing methods, adaptable to various materials and settings, with environmental consciousness. This course also provides ample opportunity to the fine art and architecture student to explore possibilities of integrating screen-printed imagery, surface textures, and graphic transfers in general, into drafting, painting, printmaking, and architectural modeling, and site specific installation formats.

ART 401: Advanced Painting

3.00 Credits

Emphasis on development of individual style-form concepts. Materials and techniques of painting in oils, acrylics. Studio, six hours per week. Departmental approval required. Prerequisites: 303, 304. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 406: Advanced Sculpture

3.00 Credits

Further exploration of sculptural media with an emphasis on the development of personal style. Material and techniques include a broader variety of media (metal, stone, wood, ceramics, and mixed media). Studio, six hours per week. Departmental approval required. Prerequisites: 305, 306. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 408: Advanced Metal Sculpture

3.00 Credits

Continued work in welded steel and cast metal sculpture. Instructor approval required or Prerequisite: 308 Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 410: Introduction to Digital Photography

3.00 Credits

Explores the basics of using the computer as a photographic tool. The importation of conventional 35mm film into Adobe Photoshop will be the primary focus. Must have prior experience in basic photography, i.e. working knowledge of photography and darkroom. A 35mm SLR camera is required. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 411: Advance Digital Photography

3.00 Credits

Advanced digital photography explores the aesthetics of photography in a digital medium. Expand upon the fundamentals of photography applied in a digital medium, including photo-stitching, filters, and multiple implementation of images into singular pallets, using studio, action and photojournalistic techniques, students will apply knowledge of camera physics, composition and aesthetic values to images. Culmination of course will be final presentation of advanced project in finished book format Digital SLR is required. Perquisite: 232; 329. Admission may also be granted upon evidence of prior photography and Photoshop experience please see departmental for this approval. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 420: Art and Critical Theory

3.00 Credits

An in-depth introduction to twentieth century theory as applied to the visual arts. Examines some of the most interesting and controversial modern theoretical paradigms, including Structuralism and Post-Structuralism; Modernism and Post-Modernism; Feminism; Materialist and Marxist art history; Psychoanalysis; and Deconstruction. Prerequisites: 332, or departmental approval required.

ART 422: Body and/as Image:Expression, Identity, and Subjectivity

3.00 Credits

An intensive discourse has emerged around the concept of the body in the humanities during the past couple of decades. In this class we will explore the human body as a medium of expression, identity formation, and subjectivity in the twentieth century. Representations of the body in painting, photography, sculpture, and video will be analyzed and discussed in relation to artist statements, art historical interpretations, and critical, theoretical writings from the early avant-garde (Cubism, Futurism, Dada, and Surrealism) through contemporary art practices & theory (Body Art, Performance, Feminism, Postmodernism). Some of the artists whose work we will examine are: Marcel Duchamp, Alfred Stieglitz, André Kertész, Claude Cahun, Salvador Dali, Frida Kahlo, Willem de Kooning, Matthew Barney, Vito Acconci, Joseph Beuys, Philip Pearlstein, Yves Klein, Ana Mendieta, Janine Antoni, Laurie Anderson, Robert Mapplethorpe, Mona Hatoum, Orlan, Kiki Smith, Shirin Neshat, Cindy Sherman, Bill Viola, Carolee Schneemann, Chris Burden, Yasumasa Morimura, and Lynn Hershman.

ART 439: Advance Photography

3.00 Credits

This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore advanced black and white photography techniques as well as expand on personal style. A 35mm SLR camera is required. Prerequisites: Art 309, Art 339 or Approval from Professor. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 442: Advance Web Design Using CSS

3.00 Credits

Continuing on ART 342, this course introduces students to advanced web design techniques using Cascading Style Sheets, or CSS. Students will learn standards-compliant formatting; color and typography; table-free design; cross-platform and cross-browser techniques, and creating multi-column layouts, as well as discuss where CSS is likely to take the Internet. Prerequisite ART 342 Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 446: Painting

3.00 Credits

Open to beginning and advanced students and qualified high school students. An exploration of traditional and contemporary approaches to media, picture plane, and subject matter. Summer Sessions only. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 451: Senior Studio Art Coordinating Seminar

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 451A: Senior Art History Coordinating Seminar

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 452: CUA@NGA: Avdanced Modern Art from Edouard Manet to Salvador Dali

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 456: Advanced Studio Problems

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 471: Ceramic Art

3.00 Credits

Open to concentrators and nonconcentrators who wish to acquire a direct perception of aesthetic values inherent in ceramic art and are interested in acquiring a knowledge of special aspects of ceramic art, such as ceramic sculpture, Raku, slip, underglaze and majolica decorative qualities, Egyptian paste, and terra sigillata. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 473: Studio Concepts: Virtues and Vices

3.00 Credits

Students will investigate the traditional symbolism of virtue and vice, in the context of contemporary experience. The two central themes of this upper level studio seminar will be the Four Cardinal Virtues and the Seven Deadly Sins. Students will create two and three dimensional projects that reflect upon these enduringly evocative religious themes. The class will culminate in a collaborative project depicting the Temptation of St. Anthony, whose passionate piety has inspired devotional art for almost two millennia. This final project will conclude with a public exhibition of selected works produced in the course, which will be held in conjunction with a public lecture (given by the instructor) on the treatment of Virtue and Vice in contemporary art. Prerequisites: ART 101, ART 102 and ART 201 or Permission of Instructor Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 474: Seeing is Believing

3.00 Credits

The poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote that looking at art demands the willing suspension of disbelief. This course links the very human act of looking to the transcendental in art and life. Through lectures, discussions, life model studies, and individual projects, students will examine the question of seeing and will apply it to their own creative work in the studio. Instructor approval required. Prerequisites: Art Major Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 475: Intermediate Ceramic Art

3.00 Credits

Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 481: Senior Honors Tutorial

3.00 Credits

Guides Art History majors in researching and writing the Senior Thesis. Departmental approval required.

ART 494H: Independent Study Art History

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 494S: Independent Study Studio Art

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 495H: Internship - Art History

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 495S: Internship - Studio Art

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 498H: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination: Art History

0 Credits

no description available

ART 498S: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination: Studio Art

0 Credits

no description available

ART 501: Byzantium and the West

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the visual culture of Byzantine Empire from the founding of Constantinople in A.D. 330 to the 15th century. The class will use the resources of Dumbarton Oaks Museum, which holds one of the most important collections of Early Christian and Byzantine art in North America. We will experience first hand the objects in the collection, including mosaics, metalwork, ivories, textiles, icon paintings, and illuminated manuscripts from a variety of contexts, secular and ecclesiastical, private and public. Through a number of case studies we will think and talk about forms of visual expression in Byzantium and their use in the shaping and reproduction of main cultural and social structures.

ART 502: Art, Death & the Afterlife

3.00 Credits

This course will explore Greek and Roman conceptions of death and afterlife, and their expression in funerary art and architecture from the early Archaic period through Late Antiquity. The course will examine rituals such as cremation, inhumation, funerary processions and other mourning and commemorative practices, as well as various types of burial markers and monuments, including stelai, urns, ossuaries, sarcophagi, catacomb paintings, and chamber tombs. Decorative imagery, inscriptions, and tomb structures will be studied from various perspectives as indicators of social status and cultural identity, gender and family structure, and beliefs about the afterlife. The dynamic effects of cross-cultural influence in Hellenistic Asia Minor and Roman Egypt will be investigated, as will the enduring impact of these ancient cosmologies and art forms on later cults and cultures, including Christianity in the later Roman period.

ART 508: Drawing and Painting

3.00 Credits

Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with experience in drawing. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Summer Sessions only. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 509: Metal Sculpture

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 528: Ceramics Art

3.00 Credits

Open to beginning and advanced students. Aesthetics and historical aspects of ceramics. Various ways of shaping clay: throwing, coiling, slab, Raku, Egyptian paste, underglaze, overglaze, and slip treatments. For those qualified, glaze formulation and firing procedures. Materials covered depend on each student's interest and experience. Summer Sessions only. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 529: Intro to Digital Photography and Photoshop

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 531: Introduction to Digital Design: Motion Graphics & Graphic Design

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide a survey of the role of the computer in contemporary art and design. Students will receive basic training on the primary types of software and peripherals with which digital artists and designers must be familiar. This includes photo manipulation and compositing with Photoshop, text and vector illustration with Illustrator, publication layout design with InDesign, and motion graphics and animation with After Effects. Students will be encouraged to develop creative approaches to projects coupled with increased technical proficiency. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 533: Western Medieval Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

Surveys the art and architecture of the Middle Ages in Western Europe, from the age of Charlemagne through the Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, and from England to the borders of the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. Slide lectures, readings, and discussions consider secular and vernacular art forms in addition to art created for the use and glory of the Christian church.

ART 534: Sculpting Saints, Angels and Demons: Studio Figurative Sculpture in Clay

3.00 Credits

Tired of pushing a pencil? Try this soup-to-nuts introduction to modeling the figure in clay. Begin by mastering plasticine techniques while sculpting a gargoyle. Then, using the life model as a guide, explore the expressiveness of the human body with a series of clay figure studies, based on various saints. Then create a 25' completed figure-sculpture as a final project. Students will become acquainted with historical approaches to sculpting and religious sculpture, and discover their inner Michaelangelos. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 566: The Allure of Egypt

3.00 Credits

This course surveys the complex dialogue between Egypt, Greece, and Rome, focusing on the period between the invasion of Egypt by Alexander the Great (322 B.C.) and the Arab conquest (A.D. 642). The influence of Egyptian culture during these centuries was powerful and pervasive. The course explores this phenomenon in Greek and Roman art, architecture, religion, and literature, and includes an introductory survey of Egyptian art, architecture, and archeology.

ART 571: Advanced Ceramics Art

3.00 Credits

Open to those who have taken 471 or 472; involves the forming and shaping of objects on the potter's wheel. Includes approaches to form as it relates to the potter's wheel and a discussion of the possibilities that exist in the glazing, decorating, and firing of the objects made. Studio, six hours per week. Departmental approval required. Prerequisite: 471 or 472. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 574: Islamic Art and Architecture

3.00 Credits

This course examines Islamic art and architecture of the Mediterranean during the period between the rise of Islam and the expansion of the Ottoman Empire (7th-16th c.). It focuses mainly on the patronage of a succession of dynasties in major urban centers, on regions circling the Mediterranean, from the Iberian Peninsula to Syria. Slide lectures, readings, and discussions consider religious, secular and vernacular art forms. By examining the cultural, religious, political, and socio- economic contexts within which Islamic art and architecture developed, the course will provide an understanding of its major themes and regional variations.

ART 575: Artistic Exchange between the Netherlands and Italy

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 585: Methods and Concepts of Art Education

3.00 Credits

Explores curriculum planning, organization, instructional methods and management strategies for the art classroom, as well as current philosophies of art education. Candidates become competent in developing and executing a discipline-based Art Education lesson and unit plan. They also learn the preparation and effective use of resources and materials. Prospective art teachers engage in the observation of a secondary and/or elementary art classroom, at the same time that they gain practical experience through required practicum visits (25-30 hours). This course is aligned with professional standards of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

ART 590: A World Filled with Gods: Pagan, Jewish, Christian and Muslim Art in Late Antiquity

3.00 Credits

Between the first and the eighth centuries, two new religions, Christianity and Islam, joined the Jewish and Greco-Roman religions. In this course, we will investigate the war of images during this critical period of intercultural transformation and change in the Mediterranean world. We will examine how old and new religions both competed and communicated via art and architecture. Through a number of case studies, we will investigate forms of visual expression in late antiquity; and we will consider how images of the divine functioned to shape and reinforce cultural and social structures.

ART 594H: Independent Study - Art History

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 594S: Independent Study - Studio Art

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 595H: Internship - Art History

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 595S: Internship - Studio Art

3.00 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required.

ART 614: Architecture of Ancient Rome

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 615: Architecture of Renaissance Venice (1500-1600)

3.00 Credits

At the dawn of the 16th Century, Venice was at the height of its wealth and power as the strategic and political center of northern Italy, the leading port to Europe, and a gateway to the Levant. During the High Renaissance, Venice and Veneto (its surrounding region) were home to remarkable cultural and architectural innovations. Arguably the most important architect of this brilliant age was Andrea Palladio (1508-1580). His design projects, inspired by the ancient Romans, were all constructed in the Venetian Republic; but his legacy can be seen throughout the world. Among the greatest examples of Palladian architecture may be counted Wren's St. Paul's Cathedral (London), Jefferson's Monticello (Charlottesville), and even the US Capitol. This seminar will focus on the development of Palladio's style in his churches, palaces and especially villas, and the enduring legacy of both his influential writings and his timelessly elegant design. It will draw upon the superb collection of works from the Italian Renaissance at the National Gallery of Art.

ART 619: Renaissance Art

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 620: Baroque Art

3.00 Credits

Advanced survey of the painting and sculpture of such seventeenth century masters as Caravaggio, Rubens, Velasquez, Bernini, and Poussin. Departmental approval required.

ART 621: Venetian Renaissance Art

3.00 Credits

This course will focus in-depth on the Venetian artists of the 15th and 16th centuries, including the painters Andrea Mantegna, Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Tintoretto, Veronese and Titian, whose contributions are central to the subsequent course of western art, both religious and secular. The course will also address the architecture of Andrea Palladio. Venetian art in the Renaissance will be discussed in its unique religious, historical, political, geographical, socioeconomic and literary context. The course will be taught in seminar format with an emphasis on close visual analysis of the art and in-depth discussion of critical readings. At least one class session will be conducted at the National Gallery of Art, which has one of the finest collections of Venetian Renaissance painting in the United States. Departmental approval required.

ART 623: Nineteenth Century Art: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism

3.00 Credits

An advanced illustrated survey of the art of the nineteenth century, one of the most dynamic periods in the development of Western culture. Considers some of the sweeping transformation that took place in art and society during the century, and traces the rise of modern art in the painting, sculpture, and design of this vital, turbulent age. Artists include David, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Friedrich, Goya, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Cassatt, Manet, Monet, and Renoir. Departmental approval required.

ART 624: Impressionism and Realism

3.00 Credits

A focused in-depth study of two brilliant movements in modern art history through the work of some of the greatest artists of the late nineteenth century, including Millet, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Renoir, and Rodin. Addresses the innovative production of these artists in relation to the tumultuous cultural and political circumstances of the late 1800s. Explores the pivotal influence of Realism and Impressionism upon the development of vanguard Modernism. Students are encouraged to utilize the outstanding resources of local art collections. Departmental approval required. Replaces 563.

ART 626: American Art and Culture: From the Colonial Period to the Civil War

3.00 Credits

Advanced survey of American art and culture from the Colonial Period to the end of the Civil War.

ART 627: Rome, the Eternal City

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 631: Modern Art: From Post-Impressionism to Modernism (1880s-1945)

3.00 Credits

Advanced survey of European and American art and art theory from the last Impressionist exhibitions through the rise of Fauvism, Expressionism, Dadaism, and Cubism. Examines early Modernist pioneers, such as Cezanne, Van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, Kandinsky, Mondrian, and Duchamp. Requirements include advanced readings and guided research culminating in an in-depth term paper on a modern artist or modern movement of interest to the graduate student. Departmental approval required.

ART 632: Contemporary Art (1945 to Present)

3.00 Credits

An intensive, advanced study of European and American art and art theory from 1945 to the present. Examines the major movements of High Modernism and Post-Modernism (including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Performance Art, Minimalism, Appropriation) in relation to biographical and formal concerns, contemporary social and political conditions, and current art historical debates. Requirements include interpreting primary texts and original works of art, as well as extensive research and writing. Departmental approval required.

ART 633: Digital Applications for Fine Arts

3.00 Credits

This new course is designed to enhance the fine arts studio experience by introducing progressive digital drawing and painting tools, and lifelike natural digital media and materials in a studio format. Students will create a portfolio of digital images from models, found objects, and their own imagination as they explore the amazing virtual tools and materials that state-of-the-art digital media has to offer. For the contemporary fine artist, these cutting-edge programs (including Corel Painter, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop) provide an amazing array of flexible and expressive possibilities, including virtual dry media mark makers: pens, pencils, charcoal and pastels; digital wet media: oils, watercolors and inks; virtual surfaces and substrates; and dynamic light control. This digital studio course is designed to complement the hands-on studio experience, opening new dynamic, creative directions for the student, facilitating the integration of dynamically evolving new media platforms and artistic self-expression. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 640: Women in Art

3.00 Credits

An in-depth advanced study of the role and representation of women in Western art and culture. Surveys both the evolution of women artists, and the portrayal of women in art from the Renaissance to the modern day, with special emphasis on the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Critical issues include the lack of women artists perceived as great and the role of sexual politics in art. Readings will be drawn from a variety of critical approaches, including film theory, psychoanalysis, literary theory, and feminist art theory. Field trips to local museums, especially the National Museum of Women in the Arts, are integral to the course. Departmental approval required.

ART 665: Selected Topics in Eighteenth-, Nineteenth-, and Twentieth-Century Art

3.00 Credits

An illustrated study of art history and criticism through a focused consideration of selected artists, art movements, periods, and issues from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Subject for each term will be announced in advance. (Course may be repeated with varied content and instructor's permission.) Selected topics include Manet and Modern Paris; Women in Impressionism; The Landscape Tradition. Departmental approval required.

ART 667: Van Gogh and His Circle

3.00 Credits

An advanced, illustrated study of the art, life, and legacy of Vincent van Gogh, the nineteenth century Dutch painter whose tragic life story and brilliant artistic production have assumed almost mythic proportions in modern Western culture. Considers the relationship of van Gogh's work to that of his contemporaries in Europe, as well as the unique contribution that his painting has made to the development of vanguard Modernism. Also investigates the relationship between biography and historiography in the formulation of van Gogh's popular image as a tormented visionary genius whose evocative and poignant painting was marked (if not also motivated) by suffering and despair. Course requirements include advanced readings and guided research culminating in an in-depth term paper on a focused, related topic. Departmental approval required.

ART 668: Michelangelo, Leonardo and Raphael

3.00 Credits

This seminar will examine the historic life and remarkable work of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo Buonarroti, and Raphael Santi, arguably the three most consequential figures in Western Art. We will focus on the significant relationship, and sometime rivalry, between these figures. We will also evaluate the dynamic theoretical, theological, philosophical, political, and economic contexts from which masterworks like the Last Supper, Sistine Ceiling, and Vatican Stanze emerged. Furthermore, we will examine these artists' seminal roles in shaping many of the notions we associate with the modern artist, including concepts such as artistic genius and subjectivity. Throughout the seminar, students will approach the material critically, especially with regard to to issues of historical interpretation itself.

ART 670: Selected Problems in Chinese and Japanese Art

3.00 Credits

Advanced special topics in painting, ceramics, sculpture, and graphics of selected periods of Chinese and Japanese art history. Departmental approval required.

ART 671: Graduate Ceramics

3.00 Credits

Stresses the parallel development of skills and ideas. Techniques in handbuilding and wheelthrowing are used to explore the vessel form. Open to non-art majors. Departmental approval required. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 672: Graduate Ceramics Art

3.00 Credits

Continuation of techniques from first semester. Introduction to loading and firing procedures. Students encouraged to take personal direction. Departmental approval required. Prerequisite: 671 desirable but not necessary. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account. Additional information can be found at http://art.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm.

ART 683: Video Production

3.00 Credits

no description available

ART 685: Screen Printing

3.00 Credits

This cross-platform course that combines traditional printmaking process and new media techniques, is designed to explore dynamic and adaptable screen-printing methods, materials and techniques to transform digitally generated imaging into original hand printed art work. The course will introduce and review software applications and digital tools currently available, for the purpose of generating high quality photo-stencils that can translate effectively visual information through screens into a variety of materials.This course is also an opportunity for the fine art student to explore the possibilities and potential of integrating screen-printed imagery, textures, and ideas into painting as unique works or as serial projects.

ART 696S: Master's Thesis Research - Studio Art

0 Credits

For qualified students,Departmental Approval Required. This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

ART 751: Art in the Museums

3.00 Credits

This course is open to graduate level studio students. A study of the museum and gallery collections in Washington, D.C. Lectures on the collections, new exhibitions, and extensive trips to museums and galleries. Designed for non-art majors and as an elective for studio art majors. Departmental approval required.