The Catholic University of America

Academic Concerns for Art Majors

Double Majoring and Minoring:

While you cannot double major or minor in Art History and Studio Art, you can combine an Art major with a major or minor in another subject that interests you. Recent students have double majored in art history and classics, studio art and psychology, and have minored in anthropology, business, chemistry, French, philosophy, psychology and religious studies. They have also completed multiple tracks in the Honors Program.  For more information, Art Minor.
 

Internships:

With so many museums and galleries in DC, there are numerous internship opportunities. Whether your interest is in art conservation, art education, art therapy, curating, graphic design, museum or gallery management, or public relations, you can find something that suites you.
 

Studying Abroad:

It is important to consider studying abroad as early as possible because some programs have strict language requirements that you must fulfill prior to going abroad. Think about where you might like to go: Europe, Asia, South America, Africa, Australia. How long do you want to be abroad? CUA offers year, semester, and summer programs and even trips over spring break. One of the most important things to figure out is when you can go. For Art History majors it is usually best to study abroad in spring of sophomore year or fall of junior year. Studio Art majors should work with their advisor in determining the optimal time to go abroad; often it is in the spring of junior year.
CUA has two flagship programs CUA Rome in Italy and CUA Oxford in England. These are both great programs, but you are not restricted to them. CUA has a strong relationship with IES Abroad and CIEE Study Abroad, which both offer programs all over the world. There is also a study abroad fair each year where different companies come to tell you about their exciting programs. If you decide to choose a non-CUA program you must receive approval from CUAbroad and your academic advisor.

 
 

Course Guide for Art History Majors

Freshman Year  Survey of Art History
 
Survey of Art History
Art 211 – History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages
A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture.
 
Art 212 – History of Art: Renaissance to Modern
A survey of Western art from the 15th century to the present. Investigates Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, and Modern masterworks in terms of their formal development and cultural context through readings, lectures, class discussions, and field trips. Special emphasis on developing skills of visual literacy and critical thinking.
 
First Year Experience courses
PHIL 201 in fall, PHIL 202 in spring
ENG 101 and TRS 201, one per semester
 
Sophomore Year  Subject Requirements: 1 Classics, 1 Renaissance or Baroque, 2 Modern & Contemporary
 
Classics/Medieval
Art 317 – Greek Art and Architecture
Surveys the art, architecture, and archeology of Greece from its Minoan and Mycenaean antecedents through the late Hellenistic era, with emphasis on the Classical period.
 
Art 318 – Roman Art and Architecture
Surveys the art of the Roman Empire from its Etruscan origins (8th century B.C.) until the age of Constantine (early 4th century A.D.). Examines city planning, architecture, sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts in Rome and its provinces in the context of political developments. Special emphasis on public and private patronage of funerary, religious, and commemorative (propagandistic) arts.
 
ART 335 –Medieval Art and Architecture
Surveys the art and architecture of the Middle Ages in Western Europe, from the age of Charlemagne through the Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, and from England to the borders of the Byzantine and Islamic worlds. Slide lectures, readings, and discussions consider secular and vernacular art forms in addition to art created for the use and glory of the Christian church.
 
Renaissance/Baroque
Art 319 – Renaissance Art
A survey of key monuments, artists, patrons, and subjects of art from about 1300 to 1575 in Italy, with an emphasis on the 15th and 16th centuries and Tuscany, Rome, and Venice. Works will be discussed in relation to the cultural, political, social, and/or technical circumstances in which they were made. Artists studied will include Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Mantegna, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian.
 
Art 320 – Baroque Art
Features the painting and sculpture of such 17th century masters as Caravaggio, Rubens, Velasquez, Bernini, and Poussin.
 
Modern/Contemporary
Art 326 – AmericanArt
Surveys American artistic and cultural expression from the Colonial Period to the end of the Civil War. Introduces American painting, sculpture, architecture, decorative arts, photography, and graphic work in a broad social and historical context, including the work of Copley, Cole, Bierstadt, Brady, Greenough, Jefferson, and the Peale Family.
 
Art 323 – Nineteenth Century Art
An illustrated survey of the art of the 19th Century, one of the most dynamic periods in the development of Western culture. Includes discussion of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. Considers some of the sweeping transformations that took place in art and society during the century and traces the rise of modern art in the painting, sculpture, and design of this vital turbulent age. Artists discussed include David, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Friedrich, Goya, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Cassatt, Monet, and Renoir.
 
Art 324 – Impressionism and Realism
A focused, illustrated study of two brilliant movements in modern art history through the work of some of the greatest artists of the mid-to-late 19th century, including Millet, Courbet, Manet, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Renoir, and Rodin. Addresses the innovative production of these artists in relation to the tumultuous cultural and political circumstances of the late 1800s. Explores the pivotal influence of Realism and Impressionism upon the development of Vanguard Modernism.
 
Art 331 – Modern Art
Surveys European and American art and art theory from the last Impressionist exhibitions through the rise of Fauvism, Expressionism, Dadaism, and Cubism. Examines the pioneering production of early Modernist artists such as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, Kandinsky, Mondrian, and Duchamp, whose innovative work addressed the problems of the modern condition and transformed the very boundaries of artistic expression.
 
Art 332 – Contemporary Art
A study of European and American art and art theory from 1945 to the present. Examines the major movements of High Modernism and Post-Modernism (including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Performance Art, Minimalism, and Appropriation) in relation to biographical and formal concerns, contemporary social and political conditions, and current art history debates.
 
Junior Year  Junior Seminar, 2 Art Electives, Studio Requirement
 
Art 361 – Junior Seminar
 
Studio Art Electives
Art 201/202 – Drawing and Composition
Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week.
 
Art 303/304 – Painting 
Elemental problems of painting on a two-dimensional surface; structure and composition, color, flat pattern, modeling and light, paint handling, and texture. Students work from varied life sources and imagination in oil. Studio, six hours per week.
 
Senior Year  Senior Seminar, 3 Art Electives
Art 451A – Senior Art History Coordinating Seminar

 
 
 

Course Guide for Studio Art Majors

Freshman Year  Survey of Design
 
Survey of Design
Art 101 – Fundamentals of Design I
Introductory studio art course; primary goal is the development of an awareness and appreciation of the visual experience and of the limitless possibilities for making things of beauty and delight. Learning based largely on a conscious amassing of visual experiences and the development of seeing, upon which, eventually, to realize one's own visual language and visual value judgments. Studio exercises and lectures consider two-dimensional work and color. Studio, six hours per week.
 
Art 102 – Fundamentals of Design II
Introductory studio art course. Studio projects and lectures include work in two and three dimensions plus problems in color. 101 not prerequisite to 102.
 
Sophomore Year  Survey of Drawing, Survey of Art History
 
Survey of Design
Art 207 – Drawing and Composition for Artists I
Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week.
 
Art 208 – Drawing and Composition for Artists  II
Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. 201 is not prerequisite to 202.

 
Survey of Art History
Art 211 – History of Art: Prehistoric to the Middle Ages
A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture.
 
Art 212 – History of Art: Renaissance to Modern
A survey of Western art from the fifteenth century to the present. Investigates Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, and Modern masterworks in terms of their formal development and cultural context. Special emphasis on developing skills of visual literacy and critical thinking.
 
 Art 332 – Contemporary Art (1945- Present)

A study of European and American art and art theory from 1945 to the present. Examines the major movements of High Modernism and Post-Modernism (including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Performance Art, Minimalism, and Appropriation) in relation to biographical and formal concerns, contemporary social and political conditions, and current art history debates. 

 
Junior Year  Junior Seminar, 1 Class in Concentration, Contemporary Art, 1 Studio Art Elective
 
Art 353 – Junior Studio Art Seminar
Junior Studio Art Seminar introduces studio art majors to advanced independent work.  This seminar will include field trips, readings and discussions of contemporary art, art criticism, and the role of historical events and cultural values in the production and reception of art. Each student will produce an independently conceived project in preparation for the Junior Exhibition.
 
 
Senior Year  Senior Seminar, 3 Courses in Concentration
 
Art 451 – Senior Studio Art Coordinating Seminar
 
*Students must have three semesters in one of the following areas: painting, sculpture or digital arts, and one in one of the remaining two areas.

 
Studio Art Major Checklist (suggested order of courses)
 
 
 
 

 

 

Quick Nav: Department of Art

 

Department of Art
The Catholic University of America
Salve Regina Hall
620 Michigan Ave NE
Washington DC 20064

Phone: 202-319-5282
Fax: 202-319-6390

Main Office Hours:
Monday - Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm

 

 

“The Art Department at CUA is a close-knit community made up of passionate and engaging professors who truly care for their students. I feel that I  found my niche at CUA here in the Art Department.”
 - Ashley Wilson, Art History Alumna